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Amazing Black Artists You Can't Miss

By Ian Boldon

We want to celebrate Black History Month by looking at talent artists and designers you might have missed

Styles in motion design are really diverse. From 2D, 3D, Cel-animated, VFX, character animation...there are many ways to showcase art. When it comes to the people making that art? Not so much. Attend a motion design conference and you’ll quickly find that it’s whiter than a Journey concert. (No offense to Journey fans. Any Way You Want It slaps).
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Diversity should be celebrated. Seeing the different styles, art, and perspectives that are around helps you to become a more well-rounded artist and person. By opening up your following group, you’ll open up your perspective. In the spirit of Black History Month, let’s take a look at a list of a few of these artists. 

Jade Purple-Brown

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Artist, New York. 
If you haven’t been following Jade Purple Brown, you’ve been missing out. Located in New York City, she uses bold, vibrant colors, which is enough of a reason to subscribe to her instagram channel. Her style has a psychedelic 60’s/70’s feel, with a modern edge. 

Sekani Solomon

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Lead Motion Designer,  New York 
Sekani is an award winning Cinema 4D artist based out of New York, from the twin island nation, Trinidad & Tobago. Complimenting his beautiful 3D works is  his work in particle simulation. Sekani is the Beyonce of X-Particles. On top of his amazing work with companies such as Apple, Square, and Cash App, he also finds time to put out personal projects that send shockwaves through the motion design community, like Hidden, & Star Wars: The Last Stand.  

Monique Wray

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Illustrator, animator, and Director. San Francisco
An Illustrator, animator, and director based out of San Francisco, Monique's hand-drawn, character-driven style showcases diversity, and inclusion. Her animation has a definite swagger that’s brought many iconic bay area brands calling, including Facebook, AirBnB, and Schwab. 

Handel Eugene

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3D Artist - Detroit
A Haitian-American multidisciplinary artist, Handel is the lead 3D Artist at Gunner. He has impressive credits to his name, including Spider-man Homecoming, and Black Panther. Handel utilizes multiple mediums to push the creative direction in his work. He’s also been featured on multiple motion design podcasts, including School of Motion’s.

Tristan Henry-Wilson

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Illustrator / Animator, 
An illustrator, and animator, Tristan’s work blurs the lines between oil painting and digital art. The unique style and level of detail that goes into his pieces is amazing.  The skill and care that Tristan applies to his work—notably showcased in this behind the scenes look at a recent piece—has breathtaking results.

Amanda Godreau

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Art Director/Animator/Designer
Puerto Rican native Amanda is newer on the scene, but is already putting out an impressive body of work. Amanda is already flexing a portfolio with work from Gunner, and clients with a few small companies no one’s heard of like Facebook, Google, Hulu, and the National Basketball Association. She’s done all of this, while still in school. With a wide arrange of styles, and mediums, her career is one to follow while she surpasses all of us mere mortals. 

Blacksmiths

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The Blacksmiths instagram channel launched in 2021 to showcase the work of Black creatives across the motion design industry. With a list of contributors to the channel that include people on this list, and also includes work by other artists like Rachel Reid, Hank Washington, Chris Hurtt, & Gabrielle Patterson, It’s a wonderful channel to infuse your instagram feed with a little more color.

Celebrate Black History in Motion

The intention of giving out this list is not to give you some artists to follow and forget about. It’s to open your circle to some great work you may not know exists. It’s an opportunity to seek out knowledge on your own, and learn more. Look at artists, and see what they’re into. Black History Month is a stepping off point, and it shouldn't stop when the calendar reads March 1st.