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Listen as We Direct a REAL Voiceover Session

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How do you direct a Voice Over session? Join us in the studio to find out!

When you see a finished video with a polished voiceover, it's easy to take for granted how tricky the process of recording VO can be. It’s not just about annunciation and timing. There are dozens of factors that go into creating effective, evocative voice recordings. How can you use VO to enhance your videos…and how do you work with a VO artist to bring out their best?

Hey ,friends, it’s Joey. I had the strange experience of being a Voiceover artist for many years—I even had an agent at one point—so I thought that it'd be really useful to record the ACTUAL VO session from Jake's Explainer Camp project. You’ll hear exactly how a professional VO session runs, and learn how to start directing VO talent to get the results you need.

In this podcast, taken from Explainer Camp, you'll hear Jake and I direct our voiceover talent, an amazing actress named Dev Joshi. This is a sneak peek inside a process that happens on a huge number of animation projects, but that is often hidden from the artists and designers. After this episode, you'll know how to run a VO session like a pro.

So sit down in your Director chair, crack open a La Croix, and yell “action!” It’s time to learn how to direct a real VO session.

Listen as We Direct a REAL Voiceover Session

Transcript

Jake: For today's podcast we have something extra special for you that I really think you're going to enjoy. I've honestly never heard anything quite like it. What we've done is recorded the entire video session for the onesecond dot org piece where I was directing the voiceover talent, along with Joey. Now I asked Joey to be on the call with me because he has an insane amount of experience with voiceover and to be honest with you, this was the first time I'd ever directed my own voiceover. So he kind of took me under his wing and he was there for my support, and he really helped get the best read out of the voiceover artist as we possibly could.

It was a really cool experience for me and I was definitely nervous. You'll probably hear that in my voice. But the woman that we used for the voiceover, her name is Dev, was completely cool, super easy-going, and made the whole thing totally comfortable. By the end of the session I wasn't nervous at all. So we're going to let you listen in on the entire video session so you can hear how we interacted with the voiceover artist with the audio technician doing all of the recording. So that you can get some real world insight into how to direct a VO session.

I've also asked Joey to step in and give a little bit of commentary and walk you through what we were thinking as we were giving her some direction throughout the entire session. So I'm going to hand the walking stick over to Joey, and he'll take you through this whole session.

Joey: Hey everybody, Joey here. Alright, so to start off the commentary on this video session, I want to give you a little bit of an overview of how I generally approach voiceover sessions. So at the beginning of any voiceover session there's this sort of awkward period where it's kind of like you're on the first date with somebody. And what you have to do is kind of build a little bit of rapport with the voiceover talent. You've got to imagine that this person has never met you. And you don't know if this is their fifth voiceover session they've done, or their 500th. You don't know how nervous they are.

And treat them as you would someone that might be sort of nervous, and they want to impress you and they want to do a good job because you're paying them. So it's always a good idea to just kind of make a little bit of small talk. And an easy way to do that is to just give them an overview of the project in general and how this voiceover is going to be used. In our case with Dev, our amazing talent that we selected for this job, we had to explain to her that this voiceover record was for a client, but not a real client. This is actually for a class, and we kind of told her a little bit about explainer camp. Okay? So let's take a listen to how this part went.

Dev, I don't know how much you know about this entire project, but we're building a course, and this is going to be a lesson on how to direct a VO session. And so through this entire course, I'm teaching students how to animate an explainer video. And in my case it's going to be a PSA for a fake company we made called One Second. And that's this script that you'll be reading. So the client is basically trying to get the message across that texting and driving, or using your phone while driving is super dangerous.

So we're using the first half of this script as kind of a misdirect. I think you've seen the animation already. But basically we don't want to give anything away at the beginning about this being behind the wheel. We kind of just want it to be happy and bubbly and fun. And kind of lead them on to thinking it's more about just staying off your phone in general. Where you need to have more human interaction instead of being on your phones all the time. So that's where we're going with this script. And then we're going to do this big, crazy impactful moment where there's a car accident, and that's when the viewer realizes, oh this is actually about texting and driving. And we get more serious with the tone, and finish off the call to action.

Dev: Awesome. 

Joey: So that's the background. And it sounded like you're already ... Your audition was great.

Dev: Oh thank you.

Joey: It sounds like you're a little warmed up already. So if you want, why don't we just start the first read through however you feel it should be read basically.

Dev: Sure.

Joey: And see whatever you think feels good.

Dev: Okay. Sounds good. Let's do it.

Joey: Alright, Joey here with another quick bit of commentary. So this is a really common tactic when you're doing voiceover sessions. And that tactic is let the talent start by doing some full reads. So they basically read the entire script, all in one go. Now if you get a really experienced voiceover artist, sometimes you can just do this over and over again until you get the exact read you want. Personally I find that difficult because inevitably you're going to be giving this talent lots and lots of notes, and they're going to have to write them down on their script and kind of remember, oh well this line, they wanted this. And this line they wanted that.

So in the end, we're going to end up having Dev read specific lines over and over again. But it's always a good idea to start with full reads. And this just kind of helps you establish the overall tone, how fast they need to be reading. It's really, really important if you have longer scripts, like some of you do on your projects, where they need to ensure that the read can be done in 30 seconds. So you kind of need to calibrate the speed of the artist's read to be able to do that fast enough. And once you've nailed that down and you've got the overall tone down, then you can go back and you can do reads of single lines or groups of lines. Alright? So we're going to start with Dev doing full reads. Let's listen in.

Dev: Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it. Look at me, answer me. Pay attention to me. Go ahead, answer it. It just takes one second. One second is all it takes. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help.

Joey: Quick note from Joey. After the first read, no matter how they did. Dev actually did a good job here. But let's assume that she totally blew it. You never want to be like, "No, no, no, no, no. That was awful." You're going to be working with this person for at least the next half hour or something like that. Make sure you focus on what they did right. And then gently give them guidance. And you're going to sort of slowly massage them into the right place in terms of tone and things like that. Alright let's continue. That was beautiful.

Dev: A little dark in the end, sorry.

Jake: No, no. That's great. We definitely want that second half to be serious and dramatic like the script says. So that was great. I really liked the energy at the beginning too.

Dev: Cool.

Jake: I think for this, the lines, "Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me." I'm going to try and line up the animation to be like these phone notifications are competing for your attention. Like they're bumping into each other.

Dev: Okay.

Jake: I kind of want to time that to the "mes" at the ends of each one of the those lines.

Dev: Sure. So hit those harder?

Jake: Right, if you could put an emphasis on "me" on all three of those lines.

Dev: Absolutely.

Jake: That would be great. Can we try that one?

Dev: Yeah. Do you want me to do the whole thing again or just the first part?

Jake: Why don't we just focus on the friendly, casual section.

Dev: Yeah sounds good.

Jake: Yeah.

Dev: Cool.

Joey: So right there you heard Jake instruct Dev to focus on one specific section. And the reason that we're able to do that so quickly was because that first read was actually a good read. There were a lot of little things that we noticed, and I was writing things down and I'm sure Jake was too. But it made sense to have Dev start to hone in. Alright? So we're already focusing on little pieces of the script. Alright let's continue.

Dev: Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it. Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me. Go ahead, answer it. Just takes one second.

Jake: That was great. I liked everything. "Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it." That was all perfect. I'd look to try the "Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me" line one more time a different way where you go I think up on "me." On every one, so it's like, "Look at me." Where you're really putting the emphasis on "me." Does that makes sense?

Dev: Yeah, yeah, yeah totally. Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me. 

Jake: Yeah that's great.

Joey: So Dev, in that first line, if you could just leave a little bit of a pause after "attention." And overall, try to exaggerate that front part a little bit more.

Dev: Okay.

Joey: Just to get more contrast.

Dev: Sure. So more musical maybe with the [crosstalk 00:08:55].

Joey: Yeah the way Jake read it was a little over the top. But kind of in that ... "Your attention is a precious commodity." Like a little ... Almost like you're tricking them. Like I'm going to sell you something.

Dev: Got it. Okay.

Joey: Yeah, yeah.

Dev: I'm going to sell ... Okay. Let's try that.

Joey: I want to talk about the exchange that just happened there. So what Jake and I are both trying to get out of Dev is more contrast between the first section of the script and the second section. Because obviously there's this misdirect built into the script. You think it's going to be this light-hearted thing about maybe an app or something like that. And in the end it's this deadly, deadly serious PSA. So what I was trying to do was to get Dev to kind of overact a little bit because you've got to understand, in Dev's mind, she's an actress, and she knows the gag. She knows that this is actually a spot in which we sort of simulate someone dying in a car crash.

And so it's kind of weird to be so happy and excited at the beginning, but that's what we need. So I kind of asked her to overdo it a little bit. And I even kind of made a joke out of it so she understood. This section, it's okay that it's going to come across as a little distasteful in the context of the spot. But we need it to be because in the end it's going to make the impact that much heavier. Alright, so let's listen in.

Dev: Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it. Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me. Go ahead, answer it. Just takes one second.

Joey: What'd you think Jake?

Jake: I loved it.

Joey: I did too. I think that's the vibe right there for that first part, yeah.

Dev: Okay. Cool.

Jake: So why don't we go into the serious and dramatic section too.

Dev: Okay.

Jake: And I think the direction we're going to want to go is not being super dark and somber and depressing. As much as, man this is hard to describe, but almost like we're just showing to the viewer, almost like I told you so.

Dev: Oh okay.

Jake: Like, "One second's all it takes." Something a little more, not so dark, but more like you should've known better.

Dev: Okay, so not so yeah okay ... Not so depressing, but a little bit more newscastery?

Jake: Right, yeah let's try that.

Dev: Okay. One second is all it takes. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help.

Jake: Great. Could we try maybe not doing it so flat?

Dev: Yeah.

Jake: And just going a little bit more in the opposite direction now where we're a little more up and down?

Dev: Sure, so I'll scale it way back and just tell me if it's closer?

Jake: Okay, okay.

Dev: One second is all it takes. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become a statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help.

Jake: Yeah, I think I like that a lot better.

Joey: Yeah I do too.

Dev: The ending's still a little bit flat. I can fix that too.

Jake: Sure. Yeah, I think the only other thing I want to try with that "One second is all it takes" line is almost like you're shrugging your shoulders when you're saying it. Like, "One second is all it takes." Like you're going up instead of ... yeah.

Dev: Okay, yeah.

Jake: Can we try that?

Dev: Yeah. One second is all it takes. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help.

Jake: Yeah I think that's my favorite so far.

Joey: Yeah I would agree with that. Yeah Dev can we do ... Jake do you want to do some series on these?

Jake: Yeah.

Joey: Yeah because I think we've gotten some pretty good full read throughs. And I think we could probably just break the script up into probably three sections and just get a few series and it'll probably be in business.

Dev: Cool.

Jake: Yeah, so on the first section then, do we want to just start with "Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it?" Joey do you think that's a good spot to start?

Joey: I would probably, yeah why don't you do the first two lines. Maybe just do a series of three. And just keep that energy up where it was.

Dev: Okay.

Joey: Yeah. And I think one of the things to be good to play with is how much you draw out the "Your attention is a precious commodity."

Dev: Got it.

Joey: Because it could flow right ... It could just be like one line that flows together, or it could be, there could be a little break there.

Dev: Okay. I'm just going to mark that in.

Joey: So what we're doing now is we're entering the phase of the voiceover session where we're going to start doing series. And all that means is we're going to break the script up into little sections of one, two, maybe three lines. And we're going to have Dev do a set of three reads each. And what this lets the voiceover artist do is really get the hang of saying whatever line they're on. And then they can sort of play with it. And one line I was really kind of waiting for her to get to was that "One second is all it takes" line.

And you're going to hear us really start to direct her when we get to that line. But keep in mind that when you're doing your own voiceover sessions, it's very often smart to get some full reads. We kind of did a couple of half reads of about half the script. And now we're going to really dial in on each section.

Dev: So just three in a row?

Joey: Yeah three in a row.

Dev: Sweet. Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it. Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it. Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it.

Jake: Cool. Could we do another set of three and bring that energy back up. Remember, it's almost like you're tricking them, like I'm going to sell you a cell phone plan.

Dev: AT&T. Yeah. Okay sure, cool. Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it. Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it. Your attention is a precious commodity. People fight for it.

Joey: I loved those. I thought those were good. What do you think Jake?

Jake: Yeah those were great. I loved that last set.

Joey: Cool, cool. Okay.

Dev: It's always the last one.

Joey: Why don't we do the same thing, set of three for the "Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me." And you could even play with like in the animation you've got these little icons that are fighting each other. And it could almost be like, "Pay attention to me." It's almost like little kids fighting over something.

Jake: Yeah.

Dev: Okay cool. So personalize each of the "mes" more. 

Joey: Yeah. That's great, yeah.

Dev: Just direct myself.

Joey: You're brilliant. You're brilliant. Do it.

Dev: Okay. 

Joey: I just want to take a second and call out sort of the vibe and the overall light-heartedness of this session and tell you that the first time you do something like this you might feel like you have to be very serious and this is businessy, and you're a serious person. You don't. Make everybody comfortable and the whole things a lot easier for everybody. Alright that's it. Here we go.

Dev: Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me. Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me. Look at me. Answer me. Pay attention to me.

Jake: Yeah, I love that personality.

Joey: Yeah, I like the last one the best too.

Jake: Yeah. 

Joey: I thought that was good. Cool, alright so why don't we move on to "Go ahead. Answer it. It just takes one second." And the only note I could give you here is that, that last line, "Just takes one second." You could maybe say it almost like ... So we're trying to avoid giving away the gag at the end. I shouldn't call it a gag. That's kind of a bad word for it. But there could almost be a little bit of a link, like, "Just takes one second." Like you kind of know something's about to happen.

Dev: Okay, so a little bit, okay. Yeah I know what you're going for. I don't know how to describe it but I got it.

Joey: Yeah, okay cool. So what I'm doing here is something you got to just be careful with. You don't want to do it too often. But sometimes it is helpful to just sort of read the line the way you hear it in your head. This really helps if you practice doing good scratch voiceovers, which I obviously recommend. But I actually gave Dev sort of a read. This is kind of how I'd like you to do it maybe? If you think it's a good idea. And then she agreed, it's a good idea. So she ends up giving me the performance that we're after. Sometimes it's a handy shortcut, just don't abuse it. No one likes to be told what to do all the time. Alright, that's it.

Dev: Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second.

Joey: That was great. I really like the last one. Can we do one more set of three?

Dev: Yeah. 

Joey: And when you say, "Go ahead," really hit that a little bit harder, like, "Go ahead." 

Dev: Okay.

Joey: Almost like you know they're probably resisting it, but you're like, "Go ahead. Answer it."

Dev: Okay cool. Yeah. Oh lord, okay. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second.

Jake: Perfect. I loved those. Can I actually ask you to do one more on that same line?

Dev: Yeah.

Jake: Where on the "Go ahead, could you say it like ... I don't know how to describe this so I'm just going to say it the way I'm thinking it.

Dev: Totally.

Jake: More like "Go ahead." Or man, that's not even right. This is not ... I've got it in my head. It's like, "Go ahead."

Dev: Okay. Like, oh it's casual. No big deal.

Jake: Exactly.

Dev: Okay.

Jake: Casual, that's the ... Come on. What's it going to hurt?

Dev: Forget about it. Yeah. Okay sure. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second. Go ahead. Answer it. Just takes one second.

Joey: Oh that last one.

Jake: Beautiful.

Joey: That last one. Yeah that was the winner. Excellent. Cool you want to move onto the serious one Jake?

Jake: Yeah let's do that. So for the "One second is all it takes" series, could we do ... Let's just start with the one that's a little bit lighter, where it's not so serious. 

Dev: Okay.

Jake: It's just kind of like, kind of casual. Like we just did with the last one.

Dev: And you just want me to do that one line three times?

Jake: Yeah, yeah why don't we start with that.

Dev: Cool. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes.

Jake: Cool.

Dev: Even lighter?

Jake: Yeah let's try it a little bit lighter, and then maybe we'll go in the other direction as well.

Dev: Sure. Okay. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes.

Jake: Great. Yeah and then a little bit more of the serious tone in this one.

Dev: Okay. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes.

Jake: Awesome. I like that series tone.

Dev: The pause?

Jake: Yeah the pause is great.

Dev: Okay.

Jake: Could we do one more series of that line where you just read it a little bit slower? Because at this moment in the script we're kind of freezing time. And we're revealing that this was taking place in a car. So you're seeing the broken windshield and stuff. 

Dev: Yeah, okay.

Jake: So it's a lot ... The pace is much different in this half.

Dev: Sure. Yeah totally. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes.

Jake: Awesome. Love it.

Joey: So at this point in the record, here's where my head's at. I'm thinking, I think we have enough to make that section sounds okay. But I feel like the impact isn't quite there. And the strategy that Jake just took was basically bracketing the emotion that Dev is kind of showing in that line, either it's flat or it's a little more kind of down. And there's this cliché thing that you see sometimes on TV shows when there's an actor and a director. And the actor goes, "What's my motivation?" Well that's kind of what I wanted to give to Dev.

I wanted to try giving her a different motivation for that line. And so the way that I direct her over the next minute or two, I want you to keep that in mind, that there's many different ways to get a performance out of your artist. You can ask them, "Try it this way. Try it this way. Try it this way. Try it however you want." And they may give you exactly what you want. You can sometimes just tell them, "Do it kind of like this." And they can do that. Or if they're a good actor or actress and I could tell that Dev knew what she was doing, sometimes you can just kind of give them the right motivation and then the performance will come out of it. So that's what's about to happen. Let's listen.

Cool, Jake I'm going to try a different direction. 

Jake: Okay.

Joey: Let me just throw darts here now.

Jake: Do it.

Dev: Hit me.

Joey: Yeah so Dev, so two things. One, I want to hear the line where there's not a big pause there. I know in the script we put the ellipsis. But let's pretend it's not there.

Dev: Sure, sure, sure.

Joey: So just, "One second is all it takes." And it's almost like if you see somebody about to fall down a staircase. And you're trying to warn them and then you cover your eyes and you're like, "One second is all it takes." I don't want to hear you grimacing as you say it. But say it almost like I knew that was going to happen and I'm very upset. Like "One second is all it takes."

Dev: Okay, so a little know it all, but not totally.

Joey: Yeah, yeah, it's going to be subtle, but yeah just a little bit. But almost like your voice should be quieter and it's like, oh shit, you died.

Dev: Lack of a better sentiment. Oh damn.

Joey: Maybe that should be the line.

Dev: You died. Okay. So I'll try, and then tell me if I'm getting closer. So something like ... One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes.

Joey: Yeah the first one was the closest one.

Dev: Okay.

Joey: Yeah and I would see if you can do this. See if you can just let your voice just almost come close to cracking. Like, "One second's all it takes." 

Dev: Got it.

Joey: Like you're kind of upset the way your voice sounds, yeah.

Dev: Okay.

Joey: You're about to hear another voice, a new voice with a British accent. And that is Simon who actually runs the voiceover agency that we used for this Damn Good Voices. He actually likes to be on voiceover records with his talent and with clients, which is not something every voiceover agency does. So you're about to hear him use some VO terminology to direct Dev. And I have to say that if you can choose to work with an agency like DGV, you should because if you're not super experienced directing VO talent, Simon is. And it's kind of like a secret weapon. So anyway, that's it. I just wanted to tell you who you're about to hear.

Dev: Let me play that.

Simon: So vocal fry without a comma.

Dev: Without a comma. [inaudible 00:25:21]

Joey: Whoa.

Dev: One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. Am I still putting in the comma? Dang it.

Joey: Yeah I was going to say, I love the way ... No, no, no, the way your voice sounded was perfect. Let's just try it without the pause.

Dev: Yeah.

Joey: So it's almost like just a bullet. "One second is all it takes."

Dev: One second is all it takes. Yeah I'm sorry.

Joey: Yeah.

Dev: I was too excited about my own voice.

Joey: Yeah, and just think of the contrast. Right? It's like, "Go ahead, answer it. Just takes one second." And then just "One second is all it takes."

Dev: Okay. Gotcha.

Joey: Yeah.

Dev: One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. Okay you kind of got a pause on the last one.

Joey: That's okay. That's okay. I think those were great. Can we just do one more set and just slow it down 10%?

Dev: Yeah absolutely.

Joey: But that was perfect.

Dev: One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. One second is all it takes. 

Joey: That last one was goosebumps. Awesome. Awesome. Okay, I'm happy with that Jake. You guys can move on.

Jake: Yeah, awesome. So the rest of this script I'm pretty much picturing it's going to be read in the same tone. Because you're just delivering these stats and telling them to go to the website. So why don't we just get a couple different ... Like a range of ways to read that. Kind of like we did with "One second." But I want to stay away from the super dark serious part on this series because this is where the viewer needs to snap out of it and this is the important information. And pay attention. So with a little bit more authority I guess.

Dev: Okay. But not too depressing?

Jake: Right.

Dev: Okay. So let's try that. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help. I hit the "you" on the last one just for some variation. I don't know if that's what you're going for.

Jake: Yeah, no that's great to have those options. I love it. I'm going to refer to Joey one more time. Do you think we should do anymore of that section? Anymore series? Different takes?

Joey: Honestly I think we got what we need.

Jake: Yeah.

Joey: Yeah I think we're in good shape.

Dev: Yeah?

Joey: Yeah, when you get a total pro it's pretty easy.

Dev: Stop.

Joey: It's a piece of cake.

Dev: Gosh.

Joey: Dev you make it easy.

Dev: No.

Joey: Yeah, no Jake I'm happy if you're happy man. I think Dev killed it.

Jake: I'm super happy.

Dev: I feel like Simon's not happy.

Jake: Oh.

Dev: Oh no.

Joey: It's classic. We're all laughing. It feels like the session's over. The client's happy. And Simon, the owner of DGV, who is also on this record actually had a pretty good idea of a different way to read the end of the script. And when you have a voiceover artist, most of the time you're paying by the hour. So even if you only use 30 minutes or 40 minutes, you pay it for the whole hour. And it doesn't ever hurt to get extra variations, which you can then play with in the edit. So we were more than happy to indulge Imon's ideas and Simon is a total pro at voiceover.

And actually had some great feedback and some great ideas here. So you're about to hear Simon offer a little more input and a few more reads from Dev.

Simon: Might I suggest from the English side of the pond.

Dev: Oh geez.

Simon: That she does that with a little more confidence and see how that sounds?

Joey: I love it. Okay.

Dev: Oh geez. So more voice, less fry?

Simon: A slightly more robust voice.

Dev: Okay, yeah.

Simon: But don't set it. 

Dev: Okay.

Joey: In a British accent.

Dev: No. Don't even, mine is so bad. Over 3000 ... No it's terrible. Okay. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help. Over 3000 people die each year in the ... Oh gosh, my first slip up. Woo hoo. Okay. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help. Over 3000 people die each year in the US from distracted driving. Don't become another statistic. Go to onesecond dot org to learn how you can help. 

Joey: Yeah I'm glad we did those. I like that. I like that set.

Dev: Yeah.

Simon: Amazing.

Dev: Simon's happy.

Simon: Good.

Joey: Awesome. Cool. Well Jake if you're happy, I'm happy man. I think ...

Jake: I'm happy.

Joey: Yeah, success.

Jake: That was beautiful Dev, thank you.

Joey: Yeah Simon, Dev thank you guys so much.

Dev: Oh thank you so much guys.

Joey: So there you have it. That is a how a very professional voiceover artist handles a VO session. And hopefully that kind of demystified the whole process for you if you've never been on a VO session before. I'm sure you could tell that as the session went on, I felt more and more comfortable and was able to give Dev some more feedback without feeling too nervous about what she was going to think. The reality is, she's 100% used to being directed. That's what a voiceover artist needs. So I hope that this gives you a little bit more confidence moving forward with how to handle a VO session. It is amazing how much a professional video artist read can really elevate your animation. Thanks to Joey for all that awesome commentary and thanks to you for listening.